Brooklyn Eagle: August 13: ON THIS DAY in 1913, governor of New York impeached

ON THIS DAY IN 1913, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Albany — William Sulzer, governor of New York, was impeached by the lower House of the Legislature at 5:16 o’clock this morning, after an all-night session, by a vote of 79 to 45, on charges of having diverted campaign contributions to his private use and having made under oath a false statement as to his campaign receipts. The impeachment of Governor Sulzer has raised a vital question as to whether under the constitution the governor will vacate his office pending final adjudication of the impeachment issue by the Senate and Court of Appeals sitting jointly as a trial court. The indications are that he will contest bitterly the theory of the opposition that he becomes automatically barred from exercising the functions of the office the moment the Articles of Impeachment are formally presented to the Senate, and that he will be disqualified from resuming the duties of executive until the Court of Impeachment fails to sustain these charges … The governor arrived at the Capitol as usual today, but refused to make any statement, except to say that he was again in conference with his counsel, ex-Judge Herrick … ‘Fine breezy morning,’ he said, adding that he might see the reporters later.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Eagle reported, “Boston — Other arrests are expected within 24 hours as the further result of the investigation of spectacular financing which began when Charles Ponzi’s Securities Exchange Company fell under suspicion. With the matter of Ponzi’s affairs pretty well in hand, Attorney General J. Weston Allen has turned his attention to other money-making enterprises which, it is claimed, have been conducted in violation of the law and to the loss of too credulous investors. Ponzi remained at his home in Lexington today, denying himself to interviewers. A score of men, supposed to be government agents and policemen, were in the vicinity of his residence apparently with a view to keeping watch on his movements.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1943, the Eagle reported, “A war veterans’ hospital in Bay Ridge appeared assured today when a resolution approving its establishment was introduced at the American [Legion] state convention in the Hotel Pennsylvania. While the resolution is one of seven offered by the Kings County delegation, many other delegations indicated their support of the measure and no opposition was expected. Setting up the hospital requires congressional approval and all of the state’s representatives and both senators have declared themselves in its favor. The convention also had before it a resolution condemning the government practice of sending home and discharging wounded men in need of hospitalization. The resolution urged that the Veterans Bureau be required to provide necessary hospital service for the men of World War II.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “Eight of Luna Park’s 16 1/2 acres were reduced to a mass of twisted, smoking wreckage late yesterday by a spectacular fire, which, though resulting in an estimated total of $500,000 damage, was brought under control without causing a single fatality. Flames shooting skyward as high as 400 feet roared and crackled across eight of the amusement park’s 16 1/2 acres, while thousands of spectators jammed Surf Ave. Towers, rides and other recreation devices tumbled to the ground as the fire raged for two hours before being brought under control.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “The Brooklyn Dodger management has been forced to change its plan to admit 8,000 youngsters belonging to the Knothole Club to tomorrow’s game at Ebbets Field with the Giants. Instead the small fry will be enabled to watch the Dodger-Philly game Monday night. It had been feared that the children would go to the ballpark tomorrow and be turned away … [Dodger Vice President Buzzie] Bavasi explained that there generally are 12,000 general admission seats available for day games … except when the Dodgers play the Giants or Braves.” George C. Wildermuth, chairman of the board of the Knothole Club, said, ‘Now the boys are going to see a night game for the first time. I think that’s wonderful.’”

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